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Introduction:

These Surname Projects are co-organized by Gregory A. Parker and Dennis West. We do this voluntarily to help families and genealogists (amateurs, hobbyist and professionals).

Be sure to visit the web site developed by Dennis West Parker Family DNA Project. The Results Page provides additional information. I particularily like viewing the Distribution of the Parker Surname in the 1880 United States Census. You may also want to visit his Frequently Asked Questions page for additional information.

Surnames of Interest:

Parker, Dalton, Cooley, Olsen, Nelson, Rodeback, Ferguson, Larson, Bryant, Faulconer, Harmon, Morgan, Cranmer, Ford, Baalsen, Hansen, Halverson, Hendrickson, Ross

Questions we hope to answer:

How are your ancestors related to other families in our DNA Project?

What are the ancestral origins of each family?

How to contact other family geneaolgists within your family group.

Genetic Genealogy

Genetic Genealogy utilizes both DNA and conventional genealogy to trace our ancestors. Just like census records, court records, other conventioanl genealogy sources our DNA can provide important clues for discovering our ancestors.

The Y-Chromosome (Y-DNA) is passed from father to son. Females do not have this chromosome. Therefore the Y-DNA provides useful information on our direct paternal lines. If two males have very similar Y-DNA they probably have a common male ancestor. If you are a male your Y-DNA is almost identical to your father, paternal grandfather, paternal great-grandfather and so on. This means that your Y-DNA will be almost idential to your cousins Y-DNA provided that both of you share a common paternal ancestor. On the other hand two individuals with significantly different Y-DNA do not share a common paternal male ancestor within recent history.

The mitochrondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed from a mother to all of her children. Although males have mtDNA they cannot pass it to their children. The mtDNA provides useful information on our maternal lines. Your mtDNA is almost identical to your mother, maternal grandmother, maternal great-grandmother and so on. This means that your mtDNA will be almost idential to your cousins mtDNA provided that both of you share a common maternal ancestor. On the other hand two individual with significantly different mtDNA do not share a common maternal female ancestor within recent history. The mtDNA does not change (mutate) as rapidly as the Y-DNA. Hence, two individuals with very similar mtDNA do not necessarily have a common maternal ancestor within recorded history.

We inherit autosomal DNA from both of our parents. In the furture our autosomal DNA will provide useful information on all of our recent ancestors.

The Combination of genealogical records and DNA can be very useful in our ancestral quest.

DNA Results:

Haplogroups are used by scientists to study migration patterns of our ancient ancestors. These ancestors lived before recorded history and are of little interest to genealogists. However, we use haplogroups and subclades to catergorize our DNA results. Haplogroups represent our most ancient ancestors. Haplogroups are subdivided into subclades. Our subclade represent more recent ancestors but are still too ancient to be of major interest to genealogists. The subclades are subdivided into family groups. Family groups are of primary interest to genetic genealogists. Y-DNA family groups are often associated with particular surnames. The most common exception stems from using patrnimic surnames as is commonly done in Scandavian Countries.

The DNA used by genetic genealogists is called "junk DNA" since it does not provide information about physical or medical characteristics. The only exception to this is DYS464. An individual with a null DYS464 results may be infertile. This result is very uncommon and we do not have any individual with a null DYS464 result.

By using the links in the following tables you will be able to see all of our current DNA results and thousands of pages of associated conventional genealogical records. All of our participants are identified by a code to protect their privacy and we only provide information on deceased individuals.

I am so confident that these DNA results do not provide any medical information that I divulge my identity. I am in haplogroup R, subclade R1b1c9, family group PF02, and finally individual P16.

 

Y-Chromosome DNA Results

Family Surname All DNA Alleles Relative Genetics Alleles Family Tree DNA Alleles SMGF Alleles YSearch Alleles YBase Alleles Yhrd Alleles
Angell Angell Angell Angell Angell Angell Angell Angell
Baalsen Baalsen Baalsen Baalsen Baalsen Baalsen Baalsen Baalsen
Cooley Cooley Cooley Cooley Cooley Cooley Cooley Cooley
Cranmer Cranmer Cranmer Cranmer Cranmer Cranmer Cranmer Cranmer
Dalton Dalton Dalton Dalton Dalton Dalton Dalton Dalton
Faulkner Faulkner Faulkner Faulkner Faulkner Faulkner Faulkner Faulkner
Ferguson Ferguson Ferguson Ferguson Ferguson Ferguson Ferguson Ferguson
Fisher Fisher Fisher Fisher Fisher Fisher Fisher Fisher
Ford Ford Ford Ford Ford Ford Ford Ford
Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek Greek
Hale Hale Hale Hale Hale Hale Hale Hale
Halverson Halverson Halverson Halverson Halverson Halverson Halverson Halverson
Harmon Harmon Harmon Harmon Harmon Harmon Harmon Harmon
Horn Horn Horn Horn Horn Horn Horn Horn
Kelsey Kelsey Kelsey Kelsey Kelsey Kelsey Kelsey Kelsey
Larson Larson Larson Larson Larson Larson Larson Larson
Morgan Morgan Morgan Morgan Morgan Morgan Morgan Morgan
Nelson Nelson Nelson Nelson Nelson Nelson Nelson Nelson
Olsen Olsen Olsen Olsen Olsen Olsen Olsen Olsen
Parker Parker Parker Parker Parker Parker Parker Parker
Rodeback Rodeback Rodeback Rodeback Rodeback Rodeback Rodeback Rodeback

 

Haplogroups:

Haplogroup E (M96)

This haplogroup is predominately found in Africa, the Middle East and Europe. The most common subbranch of E is E3. E3a (M2) is the most common lineage among African Americans. E3b (M35) is common in the Mediterranean, Europe and Middle East.

For further informaiton on haplogroup E and its subclades see:

ISOGG E-Haplogroup Information

Wikipedia E-Haplogroup Information

Haplogroup

E

Subclade Family Group List of Individuals
E3a PF92 P75
E3b PF94 P30 P48 P59 P76
E3b1 PF19 P80 P153

 

Haplogroup G (M201)

This haplogroup is predominately found in Europe, Asia (Western, Central, South and Southeast), Northern Africa.

For further informaiton see

ISOGG G-Haplogroup Information

Wikipedia G-Haplogroup Information

Haplogroup

G

Subclade Family Group List of Individuals
G PF90 P154

 

Haplogroup I (M170, P19, M258)

This haplogroup is predominately found in most European populations especially Scandinavia, Sardinia, Slavic and Bulgarian populations.

For further informaiton see

ISOGG I-Haplogroup Information

Wikipedia I-Haplogroup Information

Haplogroup

I

Subclade Family Group List of Individuals
I CF95 C06
  PF09 P27 P74
  PF16 P09 P64 P82 P98
  PF18 P86
  PF95 P03 P23 P105 P115 P124 P143 P150 P161 P176 P177
I1a PF11 P07 P78
I1b2 PF13 P52 P71 P103
I1c PF04 P05 P38
  PF22 P95 P172

 

Haplogroup J (M304)

J1 is predominately found in in Middle East, North Africa and Ethiopia. J2 is predominately found in Turkey, Iraq, Kurdistan, Lebanon, Syria, Armenia, Georgia, Aegean, and Italy.

For further informaiton see

ISOGG J-Haplogroup Information

Wikipedia J-Haplogroup Information

Haplogroup

J

Subclade Family Group List of Individuals
J PF96 P39 P138
J2 HM99 X01

 

Haplogroup K (M9)

This haplogroup is predominately found in Europeans, Asians and Native Americans.

For further informaiton see

ISOGG K-Haplogroup Information

Wikipedia K-Haplogroup Information

Haplogroup

K

Subclade Family Group List of Individuals
K2 PF97 P15

 

Haplogroup

Q

Subclade Family Group List of Individuals
Q1 MO99 M03

 

Haplogroup R (M173)

This haplogroup is predominately found in Europe and Western Eurasia.

For further informaiton see

ISOGG R-Haplogroup Information

Wikipedia-Haplogroup Information

Haplogroup

R

Subclade Family Group List of Individuals
R1a BA02 B01
  CF04 C13 C14
  CF98 C10
  PF98 P50 P66 P84 P85 P151
R1a1 CF01 C03 C03 C19 C21
  CF99 C22
  PF01 P04
R1b CF93 C01
  DF03 D19 D20
  DF99 D15 D23 D24 D27 D28 D30 D65
  FE99 T01 T02 T08
  HL01 Z01
  PF03 P18 P26 P51
  PF07 P11 P35 P83 P91 P106 P110 P113 P140
  PF08 P08 P40
  PF10 P33 P46 P141
  PF12 P70 P81 P94
  PF14 P101
  PF93 P02 P12 P22 P28 P29 P43 P47 P49 P58 P60 P61 P69 P77 P79 P87 P88 P89 P96 P118 P121 P123 P152
  RF02 R01
R1b1 CF02 C02 C11 C16
  CF03 C07
  DF04 D03 D04 D05 D06 D07 D08 D09 D10 D11 D12 D13 D14 D16 D17 D18
  HA02 H02
  PF15 P44 P122 P125 P166
  PF20 P158 P170
  PF91 P142
R1b1c FA99 F01
  NE99 N01
  PF06 P10
  PF17 P134 P139
  PF21 P174
R1b1c9* PF02 P13 P16 P16 P16 P21 P24 P25 P34 P36 P54 P56 P90 P127 P132 P178
  PF05 P01 P32 P41 P45 P67 P72 P97 P107 P111 P112 P144 P145

 

Waiting for Lab Results

Subclade Family Group List of Individuals
unk DF01 D01
  DF02 D02 D21
  PF99 P14 P53 P108 P109 P116 P126 F122